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Service delivery is about reas…
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Last modified on 7/3/2019 11:24 PM by User.

Service delivery is about reasonable respect

When the internet was new, people (in business) would deploy stuff, and if you were lucky, it barely worked. And then the usual conversations about gaps and new features would occur. Whatever uneven system you had became the status quo.

That was excusable, it was probably web 2.0. But those gaps are nagging costly problems in todays world.

Here's a brief history of my movie theater watching.

Tolerated AMC (the very nice looking, very dysfunctional website) and even enjoyed the iOS App, until it was rebooted to being cross platform. When AMC closed my favorite location, I refused to go to the closer location with all the car break-ins, and only go about once a year. 

Recently created a Cinemark account to get tickets for some friends, because the passes I bought still had to be used to "pay" via the web site, and my $7 in online fees. This is purely a convenience fee, remember, I'm not using a credit card, they aren't paying fees on the tickets.

So, I saved about $5 a ticket, but was nicked $7 along the way... which lead me to creating a rewards account.

On my second trip, I'm running late, I get a ticket and go inside. Later on, I look into getting my points for the 2nd ticket:

Two problems: everyone lets you enter missing transactions into a loyalty system. Even AMC. The whole point is that the data is more valuable than the rewards. This policy clearly hints there is no real value to posting a transaction. If so, why even have a rewards system? (Hint: the most likely cause is that their system can't handle back-dated transactions).

Also, look at the tone: "you must identify yourself..." Me? Must? Identify myself? Okay. I'm the person that drove past 2 competing locations. I must have been crazy, and I certainly won't make that mistake again. As for identifying me, to paraphrase an old Warren Buffet joke: if I didn't go, you'll know it was me.